Photo Essays Of Homeless On Skid Row

He gave each homeless person he met a white board and a marker and asked a question:

“If you could say something about yourself to anybody, what would it be?”

Some wanted nothing to do with the burly photographer who stood before them. But many others grasped the opportunity and the words flowed. They wrote in bold print or in fancy cursive, in short phrases or in one or two sentences.

“I miss cooking for my five kids. I want my family back!” wrote Jennafer Foss on a cool, cloudy day at the beach.

“I make your coffee & sleep on the sidewalk,” a young Cory Turner scrawled.

“I just want to stay alive,” printed Kevin Anderson, as he lay on a piece of cardboard.

For Hans Gutknecht, a veteran photojournalist with the Los Angeles Daily News, his 30-year career has taken him far and wide to capture images of the city’ most rich and famous. But it was the words scrawled by homeless people he met on the streets that left Gutknecht with a lasting impression. In an image-obsessed world, Gutknecht used a simple white board, a marker and a question to give homeless people a voice.

“One of the things that a lot of people I talked to spoke about was being judged and being characterized and looked at in generalities like they’re just bums or drug addicts,” Gutknecht said of the 50 men and women he photographed and interviewed over the course of more than a year.

VIEW THE PROJECT: See and hear from LA’s homeless community in their own words

“For a lot, it hurt them,” he noted “I think that a lot of them were like: give me a chance. Don’t judge me.”

Gutknecht found people who lived in makeshift encampments, slept in their RVs or stood outside 7-Eleven stores. He especially sought people outside of downtown’s Skid Row, known as the epicenter of Los Angeles’ homeless crisis.

“If you were sitting on the sidewalk, and your life was in disarray, how nice would it be if someone said: ‘How are you?’. – Hans Gutknecht, L.A. Daily News photographer

At a daily luncheon in Sun Valley offered by Hope of the Valley, Gutknecht met an elderly man named Popeye whose voice was gravelly and his words difficult to understand. But on a white board, Popeye’s words were loud and clear. “I love everyone.”

In a doorway on Hollywood Boulevard, sat Brian Maricle, who wrote: “Life is stranger than fiction.”

“Some of us are so distraught and we don’t really know what to do with our lives,” Maricle told Gutknecht. “Some people I’ve met are so distressed, they start to do drugs because of it.”

Gutknecht said he’s photographed homeless people since the 1990s, and has seen the number of people sleeping on the streets rise.

“Homelessness is worse than I’ve ever seen it,” he said. “Places where you wouldn’t see homeless before, they’re there now.”

Homelessness surged across Los Angeles County’s neighborhoods and suburbs this year compared with 2016, with more than 58,000 people sleeping on sidewalks, in their cars, or along the Los Angeles River, according to results of a count taken in January.

Some progress has been made to focus on building more affordable housing. In March, Los Angeles County voters approved Measure H and it is projected to raise $355  million a year for 10 years to help homeless people transition into planned affordable housing, among other initiatives. The funding is to go hand-in-hand with the city of Los Angeles’ efforts to build 10,000 new homes using funds under another voter-approved measure that generates money through a parcel tax.

RELATED STORY: LA County’s sale tax increases Sunday to help the homeless. Here’s how much

The focus on helping homeless people is increasing, said Gary Blasi, a retired UCLA law professor who has studied and litigated homeless issues for decades. He said Gutknecht’s photo essay forces the public to make eye contact with homeless people, to recognize them “as full human beings with thoughts and feelings.”

“More people are paying attention to the massive amount of homelessness in Los Angeles, which is a first step,” Blasi said. “But only the first step. A lot of resources and energy are being spent on moving homeless people around that would be better spent on helping them out of homelessness. But that requires real commitment, over a period of time.”

Rents for a single room in LA County have gone up 92 percent in the past six years, Blasi noted.

“The housing shortage and skyrocketing rents are driving homelessness in L.A.,” Blasi added. “Homelessness will continue to rise at double-digit rates until we get serious about the housing shortage and the public finance reforms necessary to get the resources to do that.”

Gutknecht said the people in his photo essay mentioned high rents repeatedly. Many are on waiting lists for affordable housing. But even if every homeless person could be housed, the social service system is overwhelmed, Gutknecht found, and many people have complex problems that may hinder their success.

“A lot of people struggle with their drug addiction problems,” Gutknecht said. “Obviously if they could choose a normal life, they would, but they can’t.”

Deborah Land, for example, was nearly killed by a boyfriend 20 years ago with a broken champagne bottle he smashed on her head. Her face was so disfigured that she thought of herself as “the elephant woman.”  Her life spiraled. She found heroin and lost her daughter.

Twenty years later, heroin still owns her.

“I just want to change,” she told Gutknecht. “The hardest thing is to start. I’ve seen miracles happen in the (drug treatment) programs. I just don’t feel like I deserve it.”

Robert Marks has been homeless since he was 15 years old. On the white board, Marks wrote: “Struggle Breeds Greatness.”

Marks saw his dad murder his mom, and after that day “nothing’s ever been right,” Marks, 37, told Gutknecht. “It’s affected me to the point where I don’t know how to love my family right.”

“When this is what you see and this is your environment in your formative years, how can your sense of normalcy be like everyone else’s?” Gutknecht said. “How does he pull himself up from a situation? He never really had a chance.”

While their stories and circumstances are in some cases dire, Gutknecht also noted hope among those he met.

“The ones that are hopeful, and there are a lot, they find it through spirituality or kindness that people show them,” Gutknecht said. “There are a lot of groups out there helping. Many homeless people believe God has given them purpose.”

Gutknecht said he undertook this project because he wanted the public to know that there’s a story behind the worn cardboard signs homeless people fly on off-ramps or in front of markets, asking for extra change.

“You don’t have to give them money or open your house to them,” Gutknecht said. Sometimes, a simple question will do, he added.

“If you were sitting on the sidewalk, and your life was in disarray, how nice would it be if someone said: ‘How are you?’.

PHOTOS:I am … Homeless – Gallery‎

RELATED STORY:Among LA’s homeless a photographer finds words can leave a lasting impression

RELATED STORY:How to help the homeless in LA County

  • George Mendez, foreground, a 55-year-old, sits in front of a woman in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on July 23, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Young volunteers from the Dream Center, a Christian church mission, look at homeless people from inside their bus in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on July 18, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A barefoot homeless woman sings and dances in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on July 3, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Antonio Garcia, 54, left, who introduced himself as a mathematician, peeks through the opening of his makeshift shelter made of cardboard boxes in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 29, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Torrance Moore, 46, right, prepares cardboard for bedding while setting up a tent on the sidewalk in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 29, 2013. Homeless people are allowed to pitch their tents between 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. in this particular section. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Birds eat bread crumbs on an empty street of the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on July 18, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A woman rolls her luggage down the sidewalk in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 12, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • People form a line to get a free hotdog from a charity organization in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on Tuesday, July 23, 2013. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

  • Cesar Solozano, 60, left, a former homeless man, laughs while waiting to cross the street in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on July 3, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Jesse Raca, a 58-year-old homeless man, leans on the shutters of a closed store while trying to sleep in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 19, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A homeless woman walks past graffiti on a wall outside a shelter in the Skid Row section of Los Angeles on March 6, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Margaret Warrick, a 55-year-old homeless woman, lies on a bench in the outdoor courtyard of the Midnight Mission in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on April 18, 2013. Warrick says she spends the night in the courtyard because it is safer than sleeping on the street by herself. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A homeless man sleeps in the outdoor courtyard of the Midnight Mission in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on April 18, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A homeless man holds a torn piece of paper showing a painting of the Buddha in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 12, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Pastor Emmanuel Okoli, standing next to a cross, gives a sermon to homeless people at Outreach Mission Center in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 21, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Wearing a Barbie backpack, a homeless woman pushes a shopping cart full of her belongings in the middle of the street in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 19, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A homeless woman eats a piece of fruit as two homeless men cast shadows on the wall in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 21, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Antoinette Theus, 45, who says she has been homeless for 30 years, drinks a can of soda in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on April 11, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A homeless man pushes a shopping cart full of his belongings across an intersection in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles by March 29, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Shawn McGray, a 34-year-old homeless man, looks through a dumpster for anything useful in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on March 21, 2013. McGray said his goal is to save enough money to move into a small apartment. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Sonya Martinez, 38, who says she has been homeless for 10 years off-and-on, sits in San Julian Park while waiting for her husband in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles Sept. 4, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A person walks past a sign during a narcotics anonymous meeting in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on July 3, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • Homeless people attend a daily Bible study class at the Emmanuel Baptist Rescue Mission in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on July 18, 2013. The church doubles as a shelter for homeless men and the Bible study attendance is required in order to get a bed assignment. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A woman casts a shadow on the shutters of a closed store with a “God Loves You” message written on it in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on Sept. 16, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

  • A man talks with a homeless woman in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles on July 18, 2013. AP Photo by Jae C. Hong

Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles has been home for thousands of homeless people, a tenuous comfort zone for many who hit the rock bottom of their lives in America.

The area, originally agricultural until the 1870s when railroads first entered Los Angeles, has maintained a transient nature through the years from the influxes of short-term workers, migrants fleeing economic hardship during the Great Depression, military personnel shipping out during World War II and the Vietnam War and low-skilled workers with limited transportation options who need to remain close to the city’s core, according to the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce.

It’s also become a battleground where many of the poor fight drug addiction and alcoholism.

On Skid Row they’re offered a place to sleep, food, counseling and even spiritual support. Some win the battle and turn their miseries into testimonies. Others don’t.

Temptation lurks on every corner of the grid — but so do helping hands.

The fight continues today. The warm afternoon sunlight shines on those who sleep on the sidewalk.

This essay and these images are from Jae C. Hong, a photojournalist with The Associated Press. Related: Read journalist Greg Kaufmann’s essay, “Yearning for the Betterment of People’s Lives.” 

  homeless, homelessness, housing news, Jae C. Hong, Los Angeles, Los Angeles Skid Row, photography, photojournalism, Poverty, Skid Row news

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